The 5 Love Languages Hardcover Special Edition: The Secret to Love That Lasts

Thương hiệu: Gary Chapman
Tình trạng:
Bán tại: Mỹ
Hết hàng
Duy nhất tại Giaonhan247
Mua sắm không giới hạn
Mua hộ tất cả các sản phẩm từ website TMĐT lớn ở Mỹ và các nước khác ở nhiều lĩnh vực công nghệ, sức khỏe, gia dụng, thời trang…
Bảo vệ người mua
Bảo hiểm 100% số tiền đặt mua. Đảm bảo giao dịch, bảo vệ người mua, hỗ trợ khiếu kiện với người bán, các rủi ro phát sinh sẽ được Giaonhan247 giải quyết.
Liên tục cập nhật hành trình
Hệ thống theo dõi tiến trình vận chuyển rõ ràng giúp Khách Hàng dễ dàng theo dõi hành trình đơn hàng xuyên suốt từ lúc thanh toán đến khi nhận hàng.
Đổi trả xuyên biên giới
Hãy để Giaonhan247 giúp bạn trả lại người bán nếu sản phẩm thực tế không đúng như thông tin mô tả.
Ưu đãi theo cấp thành viên
Chính sách chiết khấu đặt biệt cho từng cấp thành viên, ngoài ra có có nhiều ưu đãi hấp dẫn theo từng cấp khi trở thành thành viên thân thiết.
Đội ngũ tư vấn tận tâm
Cung cấp, giải đáp thông tin chính xác khi mua hàng. Hỗ trợ Khách Hàng liên hệ với người bán để kiểm tra thông tin sản phẩm trước khi Khách Hàng quyết định tiến hành thanh toán.
Thông số sản phẩm
Publisher
Northfield Publishing; Reprint edition (January 1, 2015)
Language
English
Hardcover
208 pages
ISBN-10
0802412718
ISBN-13
978-0802412713
Item Weight
15.2 ounces
Dimensions
5.5 x 0.69 x 8.5 inches
Best Sellers Rank
#20,186 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)#64 in Christian Marriage (Books)#120 in Marriage#142 in Love & Romance (Books)
Customer Reviews
4.7 out of 5 stars6,483Reviews
Thông tin sản phẩm The 5 Love Languages Hardcover Special Edition: The Secret to Love That Lasts
Thương hiệu Gary Chapman là cái tên nổi tiếng được rất nhiều khách hàng trên thế giới chọn lựa. Với kiểu dáng đẹp mắt, sang trọng, sản phẩm The 5 Love Languages Hardcover Special Edition: The Secret to Love That Lasts là sự lựa chọn hoàn hảo nếu bạn đang tìm mua một món Relationships cho riêng mình.
Sản phẩm The 5 Love Languages Hardcover Special Edition: The Secret to Love That Lasts đang được bán với giá ưu đãi là tại nước Mỹ.
Với khối lượng khoảng 1.14 pounds, Giaonhan247 sẽ nhanh chóng giao món hàng này về tay bạn. Dự kiến hàng sẽ về đến Việt Nam từ 01-01-1970 đến 01-01-1970 nếu quý khách thực hiện thanh toán trong hôm nay.
Ngoài ra, bạn còn được giảm 2% phí dịch vụ khi thanh toán trước toàn bộ đơn hàng và 1% giá trị đơn hàng khi thanh toán bằng VNPay. Nhanh tay đặt mua ngay hôm nay để được giảm thêm 10% phí dịch vụ từ Giaonhan247 và mức giá ưu đãi nhất từ sàn thương mại điện tử hàng đầu thế giới Amazon!
Giá sản phẩm trên đã được Giaonhan247 bao gồm đầy đủ thuế theo luật hiện hành. Nếu có thắc mắc khi mua hàng, bạn có thể gọi vào số Hotline 1900 545 584 và Email [email protected]

Mô tả sản phẩm

From the Publisher

5 love languages, five love languages, God, military, kids, relationships, gary chapman, paul white

Experience the whole series

5 love languages, wedding gift, five love languages, gary chapman, hardcover, couples books


The Five Love Languages Gift Edition was designed with gift givers in mind. If you’ve benefited from the Five Love Languages books and want to pass along the wisdom to newlyweds or couples you know, this beautiful hardcover book with its two-color interior, ornate foil-stamped cover, satin ribbon, and deckled edges makes a perfect high-quality gift for any occasion.

5 love languages of appreciation, feel unappreciated, work, connect coworkers, motivate, paul white


In this groundbreaking book Paul White and Gary Chapman apply the love language concept to the workplace. Want to know how to connect with coworkers, motivate employees, or express appreciation effectively and appropriately in the workplace? This is the book for you.

Includes an MBA Inventory Access Code when you buy it new.

teens, teen’s guide, 5 love languages, 5 love languages, how to love, gary chapman, Paige Drygas


If you have a teenage family member or friend you want to introduce to The Five Love Languages, this book is the perfect place to start. Written with teens in mind, it breaks down the love language concept and applies it to the life of an average teenager in language they’ll appreciate and enjoy.

fitness app, 5 love languages app, couples app, relationship apps, love app, love nudge
strong relationship, relationship goals, books for couples, 5 love languages, five love languages

Product Description

Simple Ideas, Lasting Love

Falling in love is easy. Staying in love—that’s the challenge! How can you keep your relationship fresh and growing amid the demands, conflicts, and just plain boredom of everyday life?

In the #1 New York Times bestseller The 5 Love Languages®, you’ll discover the secret that has transformed millions of relationships worldwide. Whether your relationship is flourishing or failing, Dr. Gary Chapman’s proven approach to showing and receiving love will help you experience deeper and richer levels of intimacy with your partner—starting today.

The 5 Love Languages® is as practical as it is insightful. Updated to reflect the complexities of relationships today, this new edition reveals intrinsic truths and applies relevant, actionable wisdom in ways that work.

Includes a His and Hers Personal Profile assessment so you can discover your love language and that of your spouse

This beautiful, ornate edition makes the perfect gift for your loved one or a couple on their wedding day or anniversary.

From the Back Cover

This meticulously crafted edition of the iconic #1 New York Times bestseller The 5 Love Languages® is the perfect gift for weddings, anniversaries, or as a special encouragement for any couple.

The Special Edition features:

·      classic, yet timeless design

·      ornate foil-stamped cover

·      satin ribbon marker

·      interior accent color

·      beautifully designed end sheets

·      high quality paper with deckled edges

With over 10 million copies sold, The 5 Love Languages® has transformed countless relationships. Conveyed with clarity and illuminated with real-life illustrations, the revolutionary concepts will equip and inspire you to express love in ways that really connect. It’s as practical as it is personable; simple as it is profound. Discover the secret to love that lasts and begin applying it to your relationship today!

About the Author

GARY CHAPMAN--author, speaker, counselor--has a passion for people and for helping them form lasting relationships. He is the #1 bestselling author of The 5 Love Languages series and director of Marriage and Family Life Consultants, Inc. Gary travels the world presenting seminars, and his radio programs air on more than 400 stations. For more information visit his website at .

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

The 5 love Languages

The Secret to Love That Lasts


By GARY CHAPMAN, Elizabeth Cody Newenhuyse

Northfield Publishing

Copyright © 2015 Gary D. Chapman
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-8024-1271-3


Contents

Acknowledgments, 9,
1. What Happens to Love After the Wedding?, 11,
2. Keeping the Love Tank Full, 19,
3. Falling in Love, 27,
4. Love Language # 1: Words of Affirmation, 37,
3. Love Language #2: Quality Time, 55,
6. Love Language #3: Receiving Gifts, 75,
7. Love Language #4: Acts of Service, 91,
8. Love Language #5: Physical Touch, 107,
9. Discovering Your Primary Love Language, 119,
10. Love Is a Choice, 131,
11. Love Makes the Difference, 141,
12. Loving the Unlovely, 149,
13. A Personal Word, 165,
Frequently Asked Questions, 171,
The 5 Love Languages Profile for Couples—for Him, 191,
The 5 Love Languages Profile for Couples—for Her, 197,
Notes, 205,


CHAPTER 1

What Happens to Love After the Wedding?


At 30,000 feet, somewhere between Buffalo and Dallas, he put his magazine in his seat pocket, turned in my direction, and asked, "What kind of work do you do?"

"I do marriage counseling and lead marriage enrichment seminars," I said matter-of-factly.

"I've been wanting to ask someone this for a long time," he said. "What happens to the love after you get married?"

Relinquishing my hopes of getting a nap, I asked, "What do you mean?

"Well," he said, "I've been married three times, and each time, it was wonderful before we got married, but somehow after the wedding it all fell apart. All the love I thought I had for her and the love she seemed to have for me evaporated. I am a fairly intelligent person. I operate a successful business, but I don't understand it."

"How long were you married?" I asked.

"The first one lasted about ten years. The second time, we were married three years, and the last one, almost six years."

"Did your love evaporate immediately after the wedding, or was it a gradual loss?" I inquired.

"Well, the second one went wrong from the very beginning. I don't know what happened. I really thought we loved each other, but the honeymoon was a disaster, and we never recovered. We only dated six months. It was a whirlwind romance. It was really exciting! But after the marriage, it was a battle from the beginning.

"In my first marriage, we had three or four good years before the baby came. After the baby was born, I felt like she gave her attention to the baby and I no longer mattered. It was as if her one goal in life was to have a baby, and after the baby, she no longer needed me."

"Did you tell her that?" I asked.

"Yes, I told her. She said I was crazy. She said I did not understand the stress of being a twenty-four-hour nurse. She said I should be more understanding and help her more. I really tried, but it didn't seem to make any difference. After that, we just grew further apart. After a while, there was no love left, just deadness. Both of us agreed that the marriage was over.

"My last marriage? I really thought that one would be different. I had been divorced for three years. We dated each other for two years. I really thought we knew what we were doing, and I thought that perhaps for the first time I really knew what it meant to love someone. I genuinely felt that she loved me.

"After the wedding, I don't think I changed. I continued to express love to her as I had before marriage. I told her how beautiful she was. I told her how much I loved her. I told her how proud I was to be her husband. But a few months after marriage, she started complaining; about petty things at first—like my not taking the garbage out or not hanging up my clothes. Later, she went to attacking my character, telling me she didn't feel she could trust me, accusing me of not being faithful to her. She became a totally negative person. Before marriage, she was never negative. She was one of the most positive people I have ever met—that's one of the things that attracted me to her. She never complained about anything. Everything I did was wonderful, but once we were married, it seemed I could do nothing right. I honestly don't know what happened. Eventually, I lost my love for her and began to resent her. She obviously had no love for me. We agreed there was no benefit to our living together any longer, so we split.

"That was a year ago. So my question is, What happens to love after the wedding? Is my experience common? Is that why we have so many divorces in our country? I can't believe that it happened to me three times. And those who don't divorce, do they learn to live with the emptiness, or does love really stay alive in some marriages? If so, how?"

The questions my friend seated in 5A was asking are the questions that thousands of married and divorced persons are asking today. Some are asking friends, some are asking counselors and clergy, and some are asking themselves. Sometimes the answers are couched in psychological research jargon that is almost incomprehensible. Sometimes they are couched in humor and folklore. Most of the jokes and pithy sayings contain some truth, but they are like offering an aspirin to a person with cancer.

The desire for romantic love in marriage is deeply rooted in our psychological makeup. Books abound on the subject. Television and radio talk shows deal with it. The Internet is full of advice. So are our parents and friends and churches. Keeping love alive in our marriages is serious business.

With all the help available from media experts, why is it that so few couples seem to have found the secret to keeping love alive after the wedding? Why is it that a couple can attend a communication workshop, hear wonderful ideas on how to enhance communication, return home, and find themselves totally unable to implement the communication patterns demonstrated? How is it that we read something online on "101 Ways to Express Love to Your Spouse," select two or three ways that seem especially helpful, try them, and our spouse doesn't even acknowledge our effort? We give up on the other 98 ways and go back to life as usual.


THE TRUTH WE'RE MISSING

The answer to those questions is the purpose of this book. It is not that the books and articles already published are not helpful. The problem is that we have overlooked one fundamental truth: People speak different love languages.

My academic training is in the area of anthropology. Therefore, I have studied in the area of linguistics, which identifies a number of major language groups: Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, English, Portuguese, Arabic, Greek, German, French, and so on. Most of us grow up learning the language of our parents and siblings, which becomes our primary or native tongue. Later, we may learn additional languages—but usually with much more effort. These become our secondary languages. We speak and understand best our native language. We feel most comfortable speaking that language. The more we use a secondary language, the more comfortable we become conversing in it. If we speak only our primary language and encounter someone else who speaks only his or her primary language, which is different from ours, our communication will be limited. We must rely on pointing, grunting, drawing pictures, or acting out our ideas. We can communicate, but it is awkward. Language differences are part and parcel of human culture. If we are to communicate effectively across cultural lines, we must learn the language of those with whom we wish to communicate.

In the area of love, it is similar. Your emotional love language and the language of your spouse may be as different as Chinese from English. No matter how hard you try to express love in English, if your spouse understands only Chinese, you will never understand how to love each other. My friend on the plane was speaking the language of affirming words to his third wife when he said, "I told her how beautiful she was. I told her I loved her. I told her how proud I was to be her husband." He was speaking love, and he was sincere, but she did not understand his language. Perhaps she was looking for love in his behavior and didn't see it. Being sincere is not enough. We must be willing to learn our spouse's primary love language if we are to be effective communicators of love.

My conclusion after many years of marriage counseling is that there are five emotional love languages—five ways that people speak and understand emotional love. In the field of linguistics, a language may have numerous dialects or variations. Similarly, within the five basic emotional love languages, there are many dialects. The number of ways to express love within a love language is limited only by one's imagination. The important thing is to speak the love language of your spouse.

Seldom do a husband and wife have the same primary emotional love language. We tend to speak our primary love language, and we become confused when our spouse does not understand what we are communicating. We are expressing our love, but the message does not come through because we are speaking what, to them, is a foreign language. Therein lies the fundamental problem, and it is the purpose of this book to offer a solution. That is why I dare to write another book on love. Once we discover the five basic love languages and understand our own primary love language, as well as the primary love language of our spouse, we will then have the needed information to apply the ideas in the books and articles.

Once you identify and learn to speak your spouse's primary love language, I believe that you will have discovered the key to a long-lasting, loving marriage. Love need not evaporate after the wedding, but in order to keep it alive, most of us will have to put forth the effort to learn a secondary love language. We cannot rely on our native tongue if our spouse does not understand it. If we want them to feel the love we are trying to communicate, we must express it in their primary love language.


YOUR TURN

How does your spouse respond when you try to show affection?

CHAPTER 2

Keeping the Love Tank Full


Love is the most important word in the English language—and the most confusing. Both secular and religious thinkers agree that love plays a central role in life. Love has a prominent role in thousands of books, songs, magazines, and movies. Numerous philosophical and theological systems have made a prominent place for love.

Psychologists have concluded that the need to feel loved is a primary human emotional need. For love, we will climb mountains, cross seas, traverse desert sands, and endure untold hardships. Without love, mountains become unclimbable, seas uncrossable, deserts unbearable, and hardship our lot in life.

If we can agree that the word love permeates human society, both historically and in the present, we must also agree that it is a most confusing word. We use it in a thousand ways. We say, "I love hot dogs," and in the next breath, "I love my mother." We speak of loving activities: swimming, skiing, hunting. We love objects: food, cars, houses. We love animals: dogs, cats, even pet snails. We love nature: trees, grass, flowers, and weather. We love people: mother, father, son, daughter, parents, wives, husbands, friends. We even fall in love with love.

If all that is not confusing enough, we also use the word love to explain behavior. "I did it because I love her." That explanation is given for all kinds of actions. A politician is involved in an adulterous relationship, and he calls it love. The preacher, on the other hand, calls it sin. The wife of an alcoholic picks up the pieces after her husband's latest episode. She calls it love, but the psychologist calls it codependency. The parent indulges all the child's wishes, calling it love. The family therapist would call it irresponsible parenting. What is loving behavior?

The purpose of this book is not to eliminate all confusion surrounding the word love but to focus on that kind of love that is essential to our emotional health. Child psychologists affirm that every child has certain basic emotional needs that must be met if he is to be emotionally stable. Among those emotional needs, none is more basic than the need for love and affection, the need to sense that he or she belongs and is wanted. With an adequate supply of affection, the child will likely develop into a responsible adult. Without that love, he or she will be emotionally and socially challenged.

I liked the metaphor the first time I heard it: "Inside every child is an emotional tank' waiting to be filled with love. When a child really feels loved, he will develop normally, but when the love tank is empty, the child will misbehave. Much of the misbehavior of children is motivated by the cravings of an empty 'love tank.'" I was listening to Dr. Ross Campbell, a psychiatrist who specialized in the treatment of children and adolescents.

As I listened, I thought of the hundreds of parents who had paraded the misdeeds of their children through my office. I had never visualized an empty love tank inside those children, but I had certainly seen the results of it. Their misbehavior was a misguided search for the love they did not feel. They were seeking love in all the wrong places and in all the wrong ways.

I remember Ashley, who at thirteen years of age was being treated for a sexually transmitted disease. Her parents were crushed. They were angry with Ashley. They were upset with the school, which they blamed for teaching her about sex. "Why would she do this?" they asked.

In my conversation with Ashley, she told me of her parents' divorce when she was six years old. "I thought my father left because he didn't love me," she said. "When my mother remarried when I was ten, I felt she now had someone to love her, but I still had no one to love me. I wanted so much to be loved. I met this boy at school. He was older than me, but he liked me. I couldn't believe it. He was kind to me, and in a while I really felt he loved me. I didn't want to have sex, but I wanted to be loved."

Ashley's "love tank" had been empty for many years. Her mother and stepfather had provided for her physical needs but had not realized the deep emotional struggle raging inside her. They certainly loved Ashley, and they thought that she felt their love. Not until it was almost too late did they discover that they were not speaking Ashley's primary love language.

The emotional need for love, however, is not simply a childhood phenomenon. That need follows us into adulthood and into marriage. The "in-love" experience temporarily meets that need, but it may cost you even more than trying to drive your car without oil. What you are about to read has the potential of saving thousands of marriages and can even enhance the emotional climate of a good marriage. Whatever the quality of your marriage now, it can always be better.

Before we examine the five love languages, however, we must address one other important but confusing phenomenon: the euphoric experience of "falling in love."

YOUR TURN

On a scale of 0-10, how full is your love tank?

CHAPTER 3

Falling in Love


She showed up at my office without an appointment and asked my assistant if she could see me for five minutes. I had known Rachel for eighteen years. She was thirty-six and had never married. From time to time, she had made appointments with me to discuss a particular difficulty in one of her dating relationships. She was by nature a conscientious, caring person, so it was completely out of character for her to show up at my office unannounced. I thought, There must be some terrible crisis for Rachel to come without an appointment. I told my assistant to show her in, and I fully expected to see her burst into tears and tell me some tragic story as soon as the door was closed. Instead, she practically skipped into my office, beaming with excitement.

"How are you today, Rachel?" I asked.

"Great!" she said. "I've never been better in my life. I'm getting married!"

"You are?" I said. "To whom and when?"

"His name is Ben," she said. "Were getting married in September."

"That's exciting. How long have you been dating?"

"Three weeks. I know it's crazy, Dr. Chapman, after all the people I have dated and the number of times I came so close to getting married. I can't believe it myself, but I know Ben is the one for me. From the first date, we both knew it. Of course, we didn't talk about it on the first night, but one week later, he asked me to marry him. I knew he was going to ask me, and I knew I was going to say yes. I have never felt this way before. You know about the relationships that I have had through the years and the struggles I have had. In every relationship, something was not right. I never felt at peace about marrying any of them, but I know that Ben is the right one."

By this time, Rachel was rocking back and forth in her chair, giggling and saying, "I know it's crazy, but I am so happy. I have never been this happy in my life."

What has happened to Rachel? She has fallen in love. In her mind, Ben is the most wonderful man she has ever met. He is perfect in everyway. He will make the ideal husband. She thinks about him day and night. The facts that Ben has been married twice before, has three children, and has had three jobs in the past year are trivial to Rachel. She's happy, and she is convinced that she is going to be happy forever with Ben. She is in love.

Most of us enter marriage by way of the "in-love" experience. We meet someone whose physical characteristics and personality traits create enough electrical shock to trigger our "love alert" system. The bells go off, and we set in motion the process of getting to know the person. The first step may be sharing a hamburger or steak, depending on our budget, but our real interest is not in the food. We are on a quest to discover love. "Could this warm, tingly feeling I have inside be the 'real' thing?"


(Continues...)

Excerpted from The 5 love Languages by GARY CHAPMAN, Elizabeth Cody Newenhuyse. Copyright © 2015 Gary D. Chapman. Excerpted by permission of Northfield Publishing.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

 

0
So sánh